Home > Celebrating Mums Everywhere – Happy Mother's Day

Celebrating Mums Everywhere – Happy Mother's Day

What does being a Mum mean to you? With Mother’s Day just around the corner Families for Children want to celebrate just what its means to be a mum.

For many adoption is the last step in what has been a long and emotional road to becoming a parent so the meaning of motherhood can in some ways mean so much more. It may be the first time you met your son or daughter or the first time you hear those words “mummy”, it maybe those morning cuddles or the complete chaos that is school runs and clubs; these all form part of our lives.

Mothers Day is a perfect opportunity to let your Mum  know just how amazing she is.

Here we Share what being a mothers means to some of our Mum’s, staff and friends –
we’d love to hear from you if you can share yours too.


“For me it’s ‘giving love and being loved, which are the best feelings ever’.”
– Nicole

“many years of waiting and hoping for a child,

 many hoops jumped through.totally overwhelmed when a dream became a reality,

 wobbly legs as we walked to a door and were handed our new daughter,

 an all consuming love from the moment we met a second chance of motherhood was begun  with a simple hiya from a child we were told may never talk,

 two bundles of fun I’d do anything for and were born in my heart and have stayed there  ahead is a lifetime of extreme parenting and motherhood more challenging and yet more  special than my wildest dreams”
 – Nikki 

A MOTHER

A person who helps and wipes a tear
A person who is there, afar or near
A person who knows that love is deep
A person who can sit and silently weep

They might give a loving kiss or caress
They might wear trousers, a skirt or  a dress
They might be brown or pink or white
They might even love or hate marmite

Some days they are grumpy or smile a lot
Some days they embarrass you about being a tot
Some days they stomp around the house
Some days they they are quiet like a mouse

At times they scold and nag you rotten
At times they feel they are forgotten
At times you know you need their love
At times it really is  incredibly tough

It doesn’t matter who you decide to call your mum
It doesn’t matter if they didn’t hold you in their tum
It doesn’t matter if you are big or small
It doesn’t matter if you are short or tall

It only matter’s that mum’s everywhere
Can know the love that children share
The fleeting thought to sad deep regret
In case their children should ever forget

My mother’s day wish is not very grand
It is simply a wish to take the invisible hand
Of my little girls tummy mummy and hold it tight
To let her know my little girl is doing alright

“A Godmother,  mother, tummy mummy, foster carer, grandmother are all mums to me
And should be applauded for the life they have created, enhanced and given for all to see
If these special ‘mum’s’ had not been on the scene
Then my life as I know would not have been!”

– Adopted Mum

“I was extremely sick throughout my pregnancy and was hospitalised for 10 weeks with my first daughter.  When she finally arrived I was shocked that I didn’t immediately feel a bond with her.  It took me about 6 weeks to really feel like me again.  When I did, the sense of warmth, achievement, love, pride and completeness was overwhelming.  I went through the same thing again with my youngest daughter.  It was even harder to bond with my youngest as there were  two people to take into consideration.  My eldest daughter is now 23 years old and my youngest daughter is 19.  I am so proud of them both.  They have grown into beautiful and independent young women and we are friends as well as mother and daughter.   A good friend told me that it was important for me to be gentle, kind and compassionate with myself and not to expect too much.  That way, if we were all having a bad day we didn’t berate each other but valued and accepted each other’s individualism.”

– Ruth